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0001 # Redis configuration file example
0002 
0003 # Note on units: when memory size is needed, it is possible to specify
0004 # it in the usual form of 1k 5GB 4M and so forth:
0005 #
0006 # 1k => 1000 bytes
0007 # 1kb => 1024 bytes
0008 # 1m => 1000000 bytes
0009 # 1mb => 1024*1024 bytes
0010 # 1g => 1000000000 bytes
0011 # 1gb => 1024*1024*1024 bytes
0012 #
0013 # units are case insensitive so 1GB 1Gb 1gB are all the same.
0014 
0015 # By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
0016 # Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
0017 daemonize no
0018 
0019 # When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
0020 # default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
0021 pidfile /var/run/redis.pid
0022 
0023 # Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379.
0024 # If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
0025 port 6379
0026 
0027 # If you want you can bind a single interface, if the bind option is not
0028 # specified all the interfaces will listen for incoming connections.
0029 #
0030 # bind 127.0.0.1
0031 
0032 # Specify the path for the unix socket that will be used to listen for
0033 # incoming connections. There is no default, so Redis will not listen
0034 # on a unix socket when not specified.
0035 #
0036 # unixsocket /tmp/redis.sock
0037 # unixsocketperm 755
0038 
0039 # Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
0040 timeout 0
0041 
0042 # TCP keepalive.
0043 #
0044 # If non-zero, use SO_KEEPALIVE to send TCP ACKs to clients in absence
0045 # of communication. This is useful for two reasons:
0046 #
0047 # 1) Detect dead peers.
0048 # 2) Take the connection alive from the point of view of network
0049 #    equipment in the middle.
0050 #
0051 # On Linux, the specified value (in seconds) is the period used to send ACKs.
0052 # Note that to close the connection the double of the time is needed.
0053 # On other kernels the period depends on the kernel configuration.
0054 #
0055 # A reasonable value for this option is 60 seconds.
0056 tcp-keepalive 0
0057 
0058 # Specify the server verbosity level.
0059 # This can be one of:
0060 # debug (a lot of information, useful for development/testing)
0061 # verbose (many rarely useful info, but not a mess like the debug level)
0062 # notice (moderately verbose, what you want in production probably)
0063 # warning (only very important / critical messages are logged)
0064 loglevel notice
0065 
0066 # Specify the log file name. Also 'stdout' can be used to force
0067 # Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
0068 # output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
0069 logfile stdout
0070 
0071 # To enable logging to the system logger, just set 'syslog-enabled' to yes,
0072 # and optionally update the other syslog parameters to suit your needs.
0073 # syslog-enabled no
0074 
0075 # Specify the syslog identity.
0076 # syslog-ident redis
0077 
0078 # Specify the syslog facility. Must be USER or between LOCAL0-LOCAL7.
0079 # syslog-facility local0
0080 
0081 # Set the number of databases. The default database is DB 0, you can select
0082 # a different one on a per-connection basis using SELECT <dbid> where
0083 # dbid is a number between 0 and 'databases'-1
0084 databases 16
0085 
0086 ################################ SNAPSHOTTING  #################################
0087 #
0088 # Save the DB on disk:
0089 #
0090 #   save <seconds> <changes>
0091 #
0092 #   Will save the DB if both the given number of seconds and the given
0093 #   number of write operations against the DB occurred.
0094 #
0095 #   In the example below the behaviour will be to save:
0096 #   after 900 sec (15 min) if at least 1 key changed
0097 #   after 300 sec (5 min) if at least 10 keys changed
0098 #   after 60 sec if at least 10000 keys changed
0099 #
0100 #   Note: you can disable saving at all commenting all the "save" lines.
0101 #
0102 #   It is also possible to remove all the previously configured save
0103 #   points by adding a save directive with a single empty string argument
0104 #   like in the following example:
0105 #
0106 #   save ""
0107 
0108 save 900 1
0109 save 300 10
0110 save 60 10000
0111 
0112 # By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
0113 # (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
0114 # This will make the user aware (in an hard way) that data is not persisting
0115 # on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
0116 # distater will happen.
0117 #
0118 # If the background saving process will start working again Redis will
0119 # automatically allow writes again.
0120 #
0121 # However if you have setup your proper monitoring of the Redis server
0122 # and persistence, you may want to disable this feature so that Redis will
0123 # continue to work as usually even if there are problems with disk,
0124 # permissions, and so forth.
0125 stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
0126 
0127 # Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
0128 # For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
0129 # If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
0130 # the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
0131 rdbcompression yes
0132 
0133 # Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
0134 # This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
0135 # hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
0136 # for maximum performances.
0137 #
0138 # RDB files created with checksum disabled have a checksum of zero that will
0139 # tell the loading code to skip the check.
0140 rdbchecksum yes
0141 
0142 # The filename where to dump the DB
0143 dbfilename dump.rdb
0144 
0145 # The working directory.
0146 #
0147 # The DB will be written inside this directory, with the filename specified
0148 # above using the 'dbfilename' configuration directive.
0149 # 
0150 # The Append Only File will also be created inside this directory.
0151 # 
0152 # Note that you must specify a directory here, not a file name.
0153 dir ./
0154 
0155 ################################# REPLICATION #################################
0156 
0157 # Master-Slave replication. Use slaveof to make a Redis instance a copy of
0158 # another Redis server. Note that the configuration is local to the slave
0159 # so for example it is possible to configure the slave to save the DB with a
0160 # different interval, or to listen to another port, and so on.
0161 #
0162 # slaveof <masterip> <masterport>
0163 
0164 # If the master is password protected (using the "requirepass" configuration
0165 # directive below) it is possible to tell the slave to authenticate before
0166 # starting the replication synchronization process, otherwise the master will
0167 # refuse the slave request.
0168 #
0169 # masterauth <master-password>
0170 
0171 # When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
0172 # is still in progress, the slave can act in two different ways:
0173 #
0174 # 1) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default) the slave will
0175 #    still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data, or the
0176 #    data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
0177 #
0178 # 2) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'no' the slave will reply with
0179 #    an error "SYNC with master in progress" to all the kind of commands
0180 #    but to INFO and SLAVEOF.
0181 #
0182 slave-serve-stale-data yes
0183 
0184 # You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
0185 # a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
0186 # written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
0187 # may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
0188 # misconfiguration.
0189 #
0190 # Since Redis 2.6 by default slaves are read-only.
0191 #
0192 # Note: read only slaves are not designed to be exposed to untrusted clients
0193 # on the internet. It's just a protection layer against misuse of the instance.
0194 # Still a read only slave exports by default all the administrative commands
0195 # such as CONFIG, DEBUG, and so forth. To a limited extend you can improve
0196 # security of read only slaves using 'rename-command' to shadow all the
0197 # administrative / dangerous commands.
0198 slave-read-only yes
0199 
0200 # Slaves send PINGs to server in a predefined interval. It's possible to change
0201 # this interval with the repl_ping_slave_period option. The default value is 10
0202 # seconds.
0203 #
0204 # repl-ping-slave-period 10
0205 
0206 # The following option sets a timeout for both Bulk transfer I/O timeout and
0207 # master data or ping response timeout. The default value is 60 seconds.
0208 #
0209 # It is important to make sure that this value is greater than the value
0210 # specified for repl-ping-slave-period otherwise a timeout will be detected
0211 # every time there is low traffic between the master and the slave.
0212 #
0213 # repl-timeout 60
0214 
0215 # Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
0216 #
0217 # If you select "yes" Redis will use a smaller number of TCP packets and
0218 # less bandwidth to send data to slaves. But this can add a delay for
0219 # the data to appear on the slave side, up to 40 milliseconds with
0220 # Linux kernels using a default configuration.
0221 #
0222 # If you select "no" the delay for data to appear on the slave side will
0223 # be reduced but more bandwidth will be used for replication.
0224 #
0225 # By default we optimize for low latency, but in very high traffic conditions
0226 # or when the master and slaves are many hops away, turning this to "yes" may
0227 # be a good idea.
0228 repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
0229 
0230 # The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
0231 # It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
0232 # master if the master is no longer working correctly.
0233 #
0234 # A slave with a low priority number is considered better for promotion, so
0235 # for instance if there are three slaves with priority 10, 100, 25 Sentinel will
0236 # pick the one wtih priority 10, that is the lowest.
0237 #
0238 # However a special priority of 0 marks the slave as not able to perform the
0239 # role of master, so a slave with priority of 0 will never be selected by
0240 # Redis Sentinel for promotion.
0241 #
0242 # By default the priority is 100.
0243 slave-priority 100
0244 
0245 ################################## SECURITY ###################################
0246 
0247 # Require clients to issue AUTH <PASSWORD> before processing any other
0248 # commands.  This might be useful in environments in which you do not trust
0249 # others with access to the host running redis-server.
0250 #
0251 # This should stay commented out for backward compatibility and because most
0252 # people do not need auth (e.g. they run their own servers).
0253 # 
0254 # Warning: since Redis is pretty fast an outside user can try up to
0255 # 150k passwords per second against a good box. This means that you should
0256 # use a very strong password otherwise it will be very easy to break.
0257 #
0258 # requirepass foobared
0259 
0260 # Command renaming.
0261 #
0262 # It is possible to change the name of dangerous commands in a shared
0263 # environment. For instance the CONFIG command may be renamed into something
0264 # hard to guess so that it will still be available for internal-use tools
0265 # but not available for general clients.
0266 #
0267 # Example:
0268 #
0269 # rename-command CONFIG b840fc02d524045429941cc15f59e41cb7be6c52
0270 #
0271 # It is also possible to completely kill a command by renaming it into
0272 # an empty string:
0273 #
0274 # rename-command CONFIG ""
0275 #
0276 # Please note that changing the name of commands that are logged into the
0277 # AOF file or transmitted to slaves may cause problems.
0278 
0279 ################################### LIMITS ####################################
0280 
0281 # Set the max number of connected clients at the same time. By default
0282 # this limit is set to 10000 clients, however if the Redis server is not
0283 # able to configure the process file limit to allow for the specified limit
0284 # the max number of allowed clients is set to the current file limit
0285 # minus 32 (as Redis reserves a few file descriptors for internal uses).
0286 #
0287 # Once the limit is reached Redis will close all the new connections sending
0288 # an error 'max number of clients reached'.
0289 #
0290 # maxclients 10000
0291 
0292 # Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
0293 # When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
0294 # accordingly to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemmory-policy).
0295 #
0296 # If Redis can't remove keys according to the policy, or if the policy is
0297 # set to 'noeviction', Redis will start to reply with errors to commands
0298 # that would use more memory, like SET, LPUSH, and so on, and will continue
0299 # to reply to read-only commands like GET.
0300 #
0301 # This option is usually useful when using Redis as an LRU cache, or to set
0302 # an hard memory limit for an instance (using the 'noeviction' policy).
0303 #
0304 # WARNING: If you have slaves attached to an instance with maxmemory on,
0305 # the size of the output buffers needed to feed the slaves are subtracted
0306 # from the used memory count, so that network problems / resyncs will
0307 # not trigger a loop where keys are evicted, and in turn the output
0308 # buffer of slaves is full with DELs of keys evicted triggering the deletion
0309 # of more keys, and so forth until the database is completely emptied.
0310 #
0311 # In short... if you have slaves attached it is suggested that you set a lower
0312 # limit for maxmemory so that there is some free RAM on the system for slave
0313 # output buffers (but this is not needed if the policy is 'noeviction').
0314 #
0315 # maxmemory <bytes>
0316 
0317 # MAXMEMORY POLICY: how Redis will select what to remove when maxmemory
0318 # is reached. You can select among five behaviors:
0319 # 
0320 # volatile-lru -> remove the key with an expire set using an LRU algorithm
0321 # allkeys-lru -> remove any key accordingly to the LRU algorithm
0322 # volatile-random -> remove a random key with an expire set
0323 # allkeys-random -> remove a random key, any key
0324 # volatile-ttl -> remove the key with the nearest expire time (minor TTL)
0325 # noeviction -> don't expire at all, just return an error on write operations
0326 # 
0327 # Note: with any of the above policies, Redis will return an error on write
0328 #       operations, when there are not suitable keys for eviction.
0329 #
0330 #       At the date of writing this commands are: set setnx setex append
0331 #       incr decr rpush lpush rpushx lpushx linsert lset rpoplpush sadd
0332 #       sinter sinterstore sunion sunionstore sdiff sdiffstore zadd zincrby
0333 #       zunionstore zinterstore hset hsetnx hmset hincrby incrby decrby
0334 #       getset mset msetnx exec sort
0335 #
0336 # The default is:
0337 #
0338 # maxmemory-policy volatile-lru
0339 
0340 # LRU and minimal TTL algorithms are not precise algorithms but approximated
0341 # algorithms (in order to save memory), so you can select as well the sample
0342 # size to check. For instance for default Redis will check three keys and
0343 # pick the one that was used less recently, you can change the sample size
0344 # using the following configuration directive.
0345 #
0346 # maxmemory-samples 3
0347 
0348 ############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
0349 
0350 # By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
0351 # good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
0352 # a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
0353 # the configured save points).
0354 #
0355 # The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
0356 # much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
0357 # (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
0358 # dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
0359 # wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
0360 # still running correctly.
0361 #
0362 # AOF and RDB persistence can be enabled at the same time without problems.
0363 # If the AOF is enabled on startup Redis will load the AOF, that is the file
0364 # with the better durability guarantees.
0365 #
0366 # Please check http://redis.io/topics/persistence for more information.
0367 
0368 appendonly no
0369 
0370 # The name of the append only file (default: "appendonly.aof")
0371 # appendfilename appendonly.aof
0372 
0373 # The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
0374 # instead to wait for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush 
0375 # data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
0376 #
0377 # Redis supports three different modes:
0378 #
0379 # no: don't fsync, just let the OS flush the data when it wants. Faster.
0380 # always: fsync after every write to the append only log . Slow, Safest.
0381 # everysec: fsync only one time every second. Compromise.
0382 #
0383 # The default is "everysec", as that's usually the right compromise between
0384 # speed and data safety. It's up to you to understand if you can relax this to
0385 # "no" that will let the operating system flush the output buffer when
0386 # it wants, for better performances (but if you can live with the idea of
0387 # some data loss consider the default persistence mode that's snapshotting),
0388 # or on the contrary, use "always" that's very slow but a bit safer than
0389 # everysec.
0390 #
0391 # More details please check the following article:
0392 # http://antirez.com/post/redis-persistence-demystified.html
0393 #
0394 # If unsure, use "everysec".
0395 
0396 # appendfsync always
0397 appendfsync everysec
0398 # appendfsync no
0399 
0400 # When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
0401 # saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
0402 # performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
0403 # Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
0404 # this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
0405 # our synchronous write(2) call.
0406 #
0407 # In order to mitigate this problem it's possible to use the following option
0408 # that will prevent fsync() from being called in the main process while a
0409 # BGSAVE or BGREWRITEAOF is in progress.
0410 #
0411 # This means that while another child is saving, the durability of Redis is
0412 # the same as "appendfsync none". In practical terms, this means that it is
0413 # possible to lose up to 30 seconds of log in the worst scenario (with the
0414 # default Linux settings).
0415 # 
0416 # If you have latency problems turn this to "yes". Otherwise leave it as
0417 # "no" that is the safest pick from the point of view of durability.
0418 no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
0419 
0420 # Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
0421 # Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
0422 # BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
0423 # 
0424 # This is how it works: Redis remembers the size of the AOF file after the
0425 # latest rewrite (if no rewrite has happened since the restart, the size of
0426 # the AOF at startup is used).
0427 #
0428 # This base size is compared to the current size. If the current size is
0429 # bigger than the specified percentage, the rewrite is triggered. Also
0430 # you need to specify a minimal size for the AOF file to be rewritten, this
0431 # is useful to avoid rewriting the AOF file even if the percentage increase
0432 # is reached but it is still pretty small.
0433 #
0434 # Specify a percentage of zero in order to disable the automatic AOF
0435 # rewrite feature.
0436 
0437 auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
0438 auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
0439 
0440 ################################ LUA SCRIPTING  ###############################
0441 
0442 # Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
0443 #
0444 # If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
0445 # still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
0446 # reply to queries with an error.
0447 #
0448 # When a long running script exceed the maximum execution time only the
0449 # SCRIPT KILL and SHUTDOWN NOSAVE commands are available. The first can be
0450 # used to stop a script that did not yet called write commands. The second
0451 # is the only way to shut down the server in the case a write commands was
0452 # already issue by the script but the user don't want to wait for the natural
0453 # termination of the script.
0454 #
0455 # Set it to 0 or a negative value for unlimited execution without warnings.
0456 lua-time-limit 5000
0457 
0458 ################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
0459 
0460 # The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
0461 # execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
0462 # like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
0463 # but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
0464 # stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
0465 # other requests in the meantime).
0466 # 
0467 # You can configure the slow log with two parameters: one tells Redis
0468 # what is the execution time, in microseconds, to exceed in order for the
0469 # command to get logged, and the other parameter is the length of the
0470 # slow log. When a new command is logged the oldest one is removed from the
0471 # queue of logged commands.
0472 
0473 # The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
0474 # to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
0475 # a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
0476 slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
0477 
0478 # There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
0479 # You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
0480 slowlog-max-len 128
0481 
0482 ############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
0483 
0484 # Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
0485 # small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
0486 # threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
0487 hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
0488 hash-max-ziplist-value 64
0489 
0490 # Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
0491 # to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
0492 # you are under the following limits:
0493 list-max-ziplist-entries 512
0494 list-max-ziplist-value 64
0495 
0496 # Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
0497 # of just strings that happens to be integers in radix 10 in the range
0498 # of 64 bit signed integers.
0499 # The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
0500 # set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
0501 set-max-intset-entries 512
0502 
0503 # Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
0504 # order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
0505 # elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
0506 zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
0507 zset-max-ziplist-value 64
0508 
0509 # Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
0510 # order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
0511 # keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
0512 # performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into an hash table
0513 # that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
0514 # server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
0515 # by the hash table.
0516 # 
0517 # The default is to use this millisecond 10 times every second in order to
0518 # active rehashing the main dictionaries, freeing memory when possible.
0519 #
0520 # If unsure:
0521 # use "activerehashing no" if you have hard latency requirements and it is
0522 # not a good thing in your environment that Redis can reply form time to time
0523 # to queries with 2 milliseconds delay.
0524 #
0525 # use "activerehashing yes" if you don't have such hard requirements but
0526 # want to free memory asap when possible.
0527 activerehashing yes
0528 
0529 # The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
0530 # that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
0531 # common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
0532 # publisher can produce them).
0533 #
0534 # The limit can be set differently for the three different classes of clients:
0535 #
0536 # normal -> normal clients
0537 # slave  -> slave clients and MONITOR clients
0538 # pubsub -> clients subcribed to at least one pubsub channel or pattern
0539 #
0540 # The syntax of every client-output-buffer-limit directive is the following:
0541 #
0542 # client-output-buffer-limit <class> <hard limit> <soft limit> <soft seconds>
0543 #
0544 # A client is immediately disconnected once the hard limit is reached, or if
0545 # the soft limit is reached and remains reached for the specified number of
0546 # seconds (continuously).
0547 # So for instance if the hard limit is 32 megabytes and the soft limit is
0548 # 16 megabytes / 10 seconds, the client will get disconnected immediately
0549 # if the size of the output buffers reach 32 megabytes, but will also get
0550 # disconnected if the client reaches 16 megabytes and continuously overcomes
0551 # the limit for 10 seconds.
0552 #
0553 # By default normal clients are not limited because they don't receive data
0554 # without asking (in a push way), but just after a request, so only
0555 # asynchronous clients may create a scenario where data is requested faster
0556 # than it can read.
0557 #
0558 # Instead there is a default limit for pubsub and slave clients, since
0559 # subscribers and slaves receive data in a push fashion.
0560 #
0561 # Both the hard or the soft limit can be disabled by setting them to zero.
0562 client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
0563 client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
0564 client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
0565 
0566 # Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
0567 # closing connections of clients in timeot, purging expired keys that are
0568 # never requested, and so forth.
0569 #
0570 # Not all tasks are perforemd with the same frequency, but Redis checks for
0571 # tasks to perform accordingly to the specified "hz" value.
0572 #
0573 # By default "hz" is set to 10. Raising the value will use more CPU when
0574 # Redis is idle, but at the same time will make Redis more responsive when
0575 # there are many keys expiring at the same time, and timeouts may be
0576 # handled with more precision.
0577 #
0578 # The range is between 1 and 500, however a value over 100 is usually not
0579 # a good idea. Most users should use the default of 10 and raise this up to
0580 # 100 only in environments where very low latency is required.
0581 hz 10
0582 
0583 # When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
0584 # the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
0585 # in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
0586 # big latency spikes.
0587 aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes
0588 
0589 ################################## INCLUDES ###################################
0590 
0591 # Include one or more other config files here.  This is useful if you
0592 # have a standard template that goes to all Redis server but also need
0593 # to customize a few per-server settings.  Include files can include
0594 # other files, so use this wisely.
0595 #
0596 # include /path/to/local.conf
0597 # include /path/to/other.conf